Africana in Hawai’i

On view on the 3rd Floor of Honolulu Hale from February 5-29, 2024.

This exhibit highlights a collection of photos from the “Obama Hawaiian African Museum” collections, showcasing significant figures in the Africana community in Hawai’i and their impactful contributions to Hawai’i’s history from 1810 to the present day. In conjunction with this exhibit Mayor Blangiardi celebrates Black History Month in Honolulu. See press release below.

Press release.

HONOLULU – Mayor Blangiardi celebrated the incredible contributions of Black Americans to the history and culture of Hawaiʻi and the United States by issuing a proclamation emphasizing February as Black History Month in Honolulu. 

“Black Americans have had a distinguished and tremendously positive impact on our state dating back more than 200 years. Their stories of perseverance and bravery deserve to be shared, as does their lasting legacy on Hawaiʻi and the nation,” said Mayor Rick Blangiardi. “Honolulu’s wonderful diversity is what make this a truly special place. Let it ring out across the world that we champion all races and cultures because we recognize that people of all backgrounds contribute to the vibrant tapestry of our community.”

Today’s event featured keynote speaker Dr. Adam Robinson, Jr, Director of the VA Pacific Islands Health Care System. He emphasized how people of all races are more alike than unalike, genetically, culturally, and even spiritually. 

Other speakers included Rev. Dr. Gregory Carrow-Boyd, Minister of the First Unitarian Church of Honolulu, and Dr. Paula Burton Major, Full Professor of Social Studies Education at UH West Oʻahu. Artie Wilson, UH basketball legend and a local leader in the community, served as emcee for the event.

An historical art exhibit is also now on public display on the third floor of Honolulu Hale outside of Honolulu City Council Chambers, honoring the lasting legacy of Black Americans in Hawaiʻi. For photos from today’s event, please click here